banner ad

Interview: Chris Marinello, The Art Loss Register

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 StumbleUpon 0 Reddit 0 Email -- Filament.io 0 Flares ×
Print Friendly
Christopher Marinello, Executive Director and General Counsel at The Art Loss Register

Christopher Marinello, Executive Director and General Counsel at The Art Loss Register

Paris, 25 July 2013, Art Media Agency (AMA).

For several years, Christopher A. Marinello has dedicated his professional life to recovering stolen works of art. Art Media Agency met with him to find out more about his activities in this important domain.

What’s your background? How did you come to work with the Art Loss Register?

I’ve been a lawyer since 1986, specialising in resolving art related title disputes. The Art Loss Register and I have been a good fit for the last seven years. Since its inception, the ALR has been proficient in locating stolen and looted works of art, but they needed someone to develop strategies to recover the objects while conforming to legal and ethical standards. Over the last few years, I’ve recovered stolen and looted artworks and have mediated complex title disputes involving over €200m worth of art.

What prompts people to get in touch with you? Why does it sometimes take several years for people to come to you after a piece has been stolen?

A lot of people don’t realise we exist. That’s mainly our fault: the ALR does not have a budget for marketing and advertising, so it’s strictly word of mouth. We often get referrals once a major recovery gets publicised, but we could sure use a media blitz in places like China and Japan where the practice of due diligence searching is not as commonplace.

Do the police, or other public bodies, ever encourage people to get in touch with you?

I am proud of my relationship with police forces worldwide, especially with the BRB and OCBC, which maintain their own excellent stolen art database and recovery team. We are a free service to law enforcement and governments who rely on the art database to help locate stolen items. Our work helps the police solve crimes and catch criminals. When they’re done with their criminal investigations, the artworks are often returned to us on behalf of the theft victim or their insurance company. It is my strict policy to let the police complete their investigations before getting involved in any civil recovery or negotiation. Those involved in art recovery and do not refer to the police are, in my view, not acting legally or ethically…

http://www.artmediaagency.com/en/70447/interview-chris-marinello-the-art-loss-register/

 

Posted in: Newsreel
Tania C. Mastrapa

About the Author:

Tania C. Mastrapa is a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics (IWP) in Washington, D.C. She is the founder of Mastrapa Consultants, a firm specializing in claims on property confiscated by the current Cuban regime. She also advises prospective foreign investors in Cuba to avoid trafficking in confiscated property. Dr. Mastrapa speaks frequently throughout North America and Europe on property restitution and privatization and has published extensively on post-Communist property reform, looted artworks, transitional justice and exile studies. She previously served as the Vice President of Cuban Cultural Heritage (CCH) and as Secretary of the Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy (ASCE). Dr. Mastrapa is a contributor to the Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research (SFPPR) and writes the blog No Trespassing for the Journal of Property Rights in Transition for which she is also the Editor-in-Chief. Dr. Mastrapa was educated at Boston College, Carroll School of Management (B.S.), Tufts University, The Fletcher School (M.A.L.D.), and University of Miami, Graduate School of International Studies (Ph.D.).

Post a Comment

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 StumbleUpon 0 Reddit 0 Email -- Filament.io 0 Flares ×