banner ad

Czech Police Find Two Priceless Statues of Saints in Austria

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 StumbleUpon 0 Reddit 0 Email -- Filament.io 0 Flares ×
Print Friendly
Statues of Saint John of Nepomuk (left) and Saint Adalbert (right) stolen in the early 1990s located in Austria.

Statues of Saint John of Nepomuk (left) and Saint Adalbert (right) stolen in the early 1990s located in Austria.

 

Prague, Nov 21 (ČTK) — Czech police have found two priceless wooden statutes of saints from the 16th and 17th centuries, stolen in the Czech Republic in the early 1990s, in Austria, police spokeswoman Petra said on the police website. This year, the police have found 15 similar artefacts, mostly stolen from churches, Strašilová said.

One of the stolen artifacts is a statue of Saint John of Nepomuk from the 16th century, stolen from the heritage institute in Opava, north Moravia, in 1992, she added. The other is a Saint Adalbert (Vojtěch) statue from the 17th century, stolen from the Church of St Lawrence in the Chomutov region, north Bohemia, in June 1994, Strašilová said. “The police found the two statues in Austria in April. This month, they were driven back to the Czech Republic and returned to their owners,” she added.

After the fall of the Iron Curtain, the theft of artifacts from churches skyrocketed. They were then mostly shipped abroad. Compared with the 1980s, this type of robbery was ten times higher after the borders were opened. Prague Archbishopric said earlier tens of thousands of artefacts had been stolen during the 1990s and if minor objects, such as small angel statues, are included, the number may have reached up to half a million artifacts.

 

http://www.praguepost.com/czech-news/42813-stolen-statues-returned

 

Posted in: Sanctum Sanctorum
Tania C. Mastrapa

About the Author:

Tania C. Mastrapa is a Research Professor at The Institute of World Politics (IWP) in Washington, D.C. She is the founder of Mastrapa Consultants, a firm specializing in claims on property confiscated by the current Cuban regime. She also advises prospective foreign investors in Cuba to avoid trafficking in confiscated property. Dr. Mastrapa speaks frequently throughout North America and Europe on property restitution and privatization and has published extensively on post-Communist property reform, looted artworks, transitional justice and exile studies. She previously served as the Vice President of Cuban Cultural Heritage (CCH) and as Secretary of the Association for the Study of the Cuban Economy (ASCE). Dr. Mastrapa is a contributor to the Selous Foundation for Public Policy Research (SFPPR) and writes the blog No Trespassing for the Journal of Property Rights in Transition for which she is also the Editor-in-Chief. Dr. Mastrapa was educated at Boston College, Carroll School of Management (B.S.), Tufts University, The Fletcher School (M.A.L.D.), and University of Miami, Graduate School of International Studies (Ph.D.).

Post a Comment

0 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 0 Pin It Share 0 LinkedIn 0 StumbleUpon 0 Reddit 0 Email -- Filament.io 0 Flares ×