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Eric N. Baklanoff

Author Archive: Eric N. Baklanoff

Eric N. Baklanoff (1925 - 20140 was Board of Visitors Research Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Alabama (UA)where he also served as Dean for International Programs (1969-1974). Before joining UA, he directed Louisiana State University’s Latin American Studies Institute and Vanderbilt University’s Graduate Center for Latin American Studies. He published twelve books, among them Expropriation of U.S. Investments in Cuba, Mexico and Chile (1975), The Economic Transformation of Spain and Portugal (1978), and Agrarian Reform and Public Enterprise in Mexico: The Political Economy of Yucatán’s Henequen Industry (with Jeffery Brannon, 1987). Dr. Baklanoff was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Palo Alto, California and was the recipient of eight other post-doctoral awards. From 1950-54 he was associated with Chase National Bank working from 1951-54 in their Puerto Rican branches. In 1957 he became Chile’s first Fulbright Scholar. His articles have appeared in Economic Development and Cultural Change, National Tax Journal, Inter-American Economic Affairs, World Development, Portuguese Studies Review, Mining Engineering, Revista Brasileira de Economia, Journal of Developing Areas, AEI Foreign Policy and Defense Review, the Luso-Brazilian Review and other scholarly journals. After his retirement in 1992, he continued to publish scholarly articles and served as a consultant on Portuguese Economic Affairs to the Library of Congress, both the Federal Research and Hispanic Divisions. Dr. Baklanoff was a founder member of the University of Alabama’s Emeriti Committee for International Strategic Studies.

Dr. Baklanoff was educated at Ohio State University (B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.).

Chile’s First Fulbright Scholar Reflects on Chile’s Political Economy 1957-1970

Chile’s First Fulbright Scholar Reflects on Chile’s Political Economy 1957-1970

When I arrived in Santiago in early January 1957 I was met by John Rhodes, Cultural Affairs Attaché at the US Embassy. A bon vivant, John was well connected with Santiago’s cultural-intellectual community. He opened doors for me that proved invaluable for the pursuit of my research project that focused on Chile’s U.S.-owned copper mining industry, [...]

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Portugal’s Fleeting Experience with Socialism: The State Enterprise Sector

Portugal’s Fleeting Experience with Socialism: The State Enterprise Sector

The military coup of 25 April 1974, which ousted the long-lived authoritarian Salazar-Caetano regime, was rapidly transformed into a social revolution that profoundly recast Portugal’s political and economic systems. The revolutionary leadership undercut the former elite’s economic base by nationalizing the banks and most of the country’s heavy and medium-sized firms; expropriating landed estates in [...]

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